Convict Conditioning App Review

If you we’re locked up in a state prison, what would you do? Some people behind bars accept their fate and silently become part of the system. Others resort to joining forces with a prison gang for various reasons. And only a few are tough enough to withstand prison life, strong enough to take down any threat, and smart enough to turn a personal trial into a triumph.

 

That’s what Paul Wade did. He served more than 20 years behind bars. But instead of succumbing to life on the inside, he used every day of his prison sentence to build a lean body and the kind of muscle strength and power that demanded respect. And when he got out, he launched the ultimate bodyweight training program: Convict Conditioning: How to Bust Free of All Weakness Using the Lost Secrets of Supreme Survival Strength.

 

The bodyweight training program based on six basic moves (push-ups, squats, pull-ups, leg raises, bridges, and the hand-stand push-up ) now has a following of millions of people on a quest to build muscle strength, and get ripped. And now there are a number of smartphone apps available to help Paul Wade disciples make the most of this program.

 

Tracking made easy by phone apps

When Paul Wade first learned the secrets of bodyweight training while in prison, he made the mistake a lot of people fired up about getting into shape make. He overtrained. That left his muscles sore for days and slowed his progress. And that’s when he made another discovery that is one of the success principles of Convict Conditioning. You’ve got to challenge your muscles systematically and progressively to get stronger without getting injured.

 

The best way to do that is by tracking your daily workouts and reviewing your progress over time. The Convict Conditioning book comes with a training schedule. And there’s also a logbook available to record your daily workout results, track your progress, and set measurable goals.

 

But if you’re like half of the adult population in the developed world, you own a smartphone.

And at least two apps are now available to help guide you through the Convict Conditioning program to build a better physique using your own body weight.

 

CC Tracker

convict conditioning app

convict conditioning app


Convict Conditioning Rep Tracker

 

convict conditioning app

convict conditioning app

 

 

 

CC Tracker vs. Convict Conditioning Rep Tracker

The CC Tracker (recommended) is available for Android ($1.99) phones and is the better of the two apps for Convict Conditioning currently available. The other app (not recommended) for the iPhone platform is the Convict Conditioning Rep Tracker ($2.99).

 

If you’re interested in a Convict Conditioning app for your iPhone or iPad, don’t waste your money. The Convict Conditioning Rep Tracker works on a very basic level, but it’s not worth the $3 of disappointment you’ll get. You’re better off ordering the Convict Conditioning Ultimate Bodyweight Training Log or getting an Android-based phone. Seriously, this app does keep track of your previous workout and lets you know when to advance to the next progression series for an exercise, but after that’s it’s pretty limited in what it can do to help you through the program.

 

So if you’re a Convict Conditioning disciple with an Android phone, you’re in luck. The CC Tracker is worth the $1.99 and is designed to help you through the 10 progression stages of the essential six bodyweight exercises: push-ups, squats, pull-ups, leg raises, bridges, and the hand-stand push-up.

 

This app lets you log your progress and provides a history of all your workouts. Something the Convict Conditioning Tracker is missing. Being able to review your progress over time is a huge factor for motivation, and it’s kind of like the tick-marks Paul Wade must have made in his cell for every rep he hammered out to get leaner and stronger.

 

The CC Tracker also includes a customizable timer that helps you consistently execute the up/down movement of each exercise. It also provides a rest timer you use to stay on track without resting too much or too little in between sets. And that’s something Paul Wade had to learn the hard way.

 

 

Watch this video to learn more about the most common mistakes people make when it comes to Convict Conditioning and how to avoid them.

 

Progressing through the stages of the Big Six is just as much about developing pure muscle strength as it is giving your muscles the right amount of rest to get stronger and build the kind of muscular endurance that most people consider superhuman.

The CC Tracker also includes a scheduling feature you can use to help you stick to your training schedule. It’s like an alarm or reminder that lets you know when it’s time to work out and what exercises you’ll be working on. One other useful feature is the Export option that allows you to export your workout data to Excel and graph your progress. This is another great tool you can use to help you stay motivated and work harder to see your progress improving from week to week and month to month.

If it’s missing anything, The CC Tracker could be improved with the addition of warm-up workouts, the option to customize the number of sets per exercise, and a social media function to tell your friends what a badass you are when you complete a workout.

 

Positives

The CC Tracker for Android phones is a good app designed to help you through the 10 progression stages of the Big Six. And it’s only $1.99.

 

Negatives

For iPhone users, the Convict Conditioning Rep Tracker isn’t worth the $2.99.

 

Bottom Line

If you want to make it easier to follow Paul Wade’s Convict Conditioning bodyweight training program, the CC Tracker Android app will help you. It’s the perfect companion to the book to help you “bust free of all weakness” and “achieve supreme survival

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Jeff Cowan

Professional trainer, ex cross-fitter and a long time calisthenic practitioner. Started with Convict Conditioning and developed levels of strength which led him to street workouts championships. Jeff writes about everything calisthenics focusing on control development, skill progression as well as injuries (as he got a few). He would love to hear from you and answer any questions you might have.

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